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Tag-Archive for "Honu"

Show The Honu some Aloha Apr 11

 Honu (Hawaii Green Sea Turtles) have been basking on Hawaii beaches since the late 1990s, visitors including myself have been drawn to them when they happen upon them during their visit to the islands. Honu have become part of the identity of the islands and hold a special place in the minds and hearts of the people of Hawaii.  Once nearly wiped out in the 1960s, conservation efforts throughout the islands over the last few years has helped the species on the road to recovery.

Did you know this about Honu? 

**  The name Green Sea Turtles is not for the color of its shell -but from the color of its internal body fat-tinted green from primarily vegetarian diet

**  Most Honu live to be 60-70 years old, weight up to about 350 pounds, and grow to more than 36 inches long

**  Can swim in short bursts up to 20 MPH when fleeing a potential predator

**  Typically found at shallow depths 0-20 feet during the day  / diving to 35-50 feet  at night to rest

Protect the Honu by following these NOAA viewing guidelines:  

** Keep a six feet respectful distance at all times – do not crowd, touch or chase

** Never feed sea turtles

** Keep your eyes open for turtles when boating or jet skiing

** Discard trash carefully, especially fishing line – protect their environment by picking up trash you might find in the water or on the beach

** Do not try to push a sea turtle back into the water or pour water on it – They do not need a helping hand from humans.

 

For more information about Honu:

www.malamanahonu.org    to volunteer or learn more – a nonprofit organization

www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/education/viewing.htm

To get started booking your trip to the Hawaiian Islands to see the Green Sea Turtles contact Linda Dancer 

Direct Line: 828-256-1520 Toll Free: 1-888-811-1888ext 331  Email  linda@honeymoonsinc.com

 

Remember:  Sea Turtles are protected by International,Federal and State Laws.  

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Some of my favorite locals Nov 22
Kauai Roosters

Kauai Roosters

 

I can still remember my first visit to Kaua’i and was amazed to find so many roosters. I like most visitors wondered why in the world this beautiful tropical island had so many colorful roosters, and being from the country found it so funny to hear one crowing in the morning.  The debate goes on about just how the roosters became so predominate on Kaua’i, but one of the theories associates Hurricane Iniki which hit Kaua’i in 1992 and decimated several chicken farms thus when the coops were destroyed the chickens and roosters were left to roam freely. There are no real natural predators to the roosters on the islands, for some reason the mongooses that keep them at bay on most of the other islands  just did not like Kaua’i. Most return visitors to Kaua’i just accept them as part of the local culture and hardly notice them anymore, and they do take care of the insect population in part as well.

 

Nene Geese

Nene Geese

 

 

 The Nene (pronounced NayNay)  is the Hawai’i State Bird – a land bird and a variety of the Hawaiian Goose-found in some of the harshest of Hawaiian locations it has adapted itself to the lava rock and barren areas like in the Volcano National Park where I photographed this pair- Hunting and wild animals took its toll on the birds and all but destroyed the species until they were named as endangered species and protected by law in 1949 and the restoration project began to build the numbers back up throughout the islands. Both male and female have the same color of plumage a golden buff  color with  black head and distinct diagonal furrows that run the length of their neck.

 

Monk Seal

Unlike most seals that prefer their home to be in frigid waters, the Hawaiian Monk Seal is a rare exception that makes its home in the warm waters     around Hawaii. Getting its name from the folds of its skin that somewhat resembles a monk’s cowl, and habitually they are found alone or in very small groups. I think they just have the sweetest faces. The Hawaiian name for the monk seal is “llio holo I ka uaua which translated means – dog that runs in rough water. Due to their declining numbers caused by their coastal habitats being disturbed as humans occupy more and more coastline  several resorts  such as Grand Hyatt Kaua’i have partnered with Monk Seal Watch Program as well as the Waikiki Aquarium house a couple to educate the public. Today they are an endangered species but unfortunately their numbers continue to decline. The Monk Seal Foundation and other organizations work tirelessly as well to educate visitors and locals alike.

Honu

Honu

 

Other than the whales that visit the islands  from late December through April and the pods of spinner dolphins found throughout the islands, probably one of the most photographed locals is the Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle (honu) such as the one I was lucky enough to catch sun bathing on the North Shore of Oahu. Considered a “Threatened Species”, the number of turtles found throughout the islands is increasing. This increase has occurred primarily through the mission of several organizations such as Malama na Honu, a non profit 501(c)(3) corportation with over 60 active volunteers that try to educate both locals and public alike. Honu guardian volunteers are on the beach every day to do their part to protect these beautiful creatures.

 

 

Contact: Linda Dancer  Direct Line: 828-256-1520  Toll Free: 1-888-811-1888 ext 331

Email: linda@honeymoonsinc.com

 

 

 

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Punalu’u Black Sand Beach Park Sep 13

Punalu'u Beach Park

Clients are always asking me where they can go to see a black sand beach and honu( Hawaii green sea turtles) Punalu’u Black Sand Beach Park is always one of the first places that I suggest they visit.
lined by palm trees

 On Hawaii Island(The Big Island) this beautiful beach is a favorite spot for locals to boogie board and fish but is also a spot frequented often by green sea turtles.  A great photo opportunity for visitors especially if you are lucky enough to can catch the pod of spinner dolphins that sometimes play off shore  amazing everyone with their acrobatic show.

According to local legend, ancient Hawaiians dove underwater with a jug to obtain freshwater during times or drought, as oddly enough this beach has a large amount of cold freshwater flowing from underground. If you take the time to wander near the boat ramp at the north end of the beach you will see the ruins of a heiau(shrine) and a flat sacrificial stone. Inland you will also see a memorial for Henry ‘Opukaha’ia at his birthplace, he entered the Foreign Mission School at age 17 with the vision of bringing Christianity to Hawai’i, but sadly he died of typhoid fever in 1818, but his dream would be fullfilled in 1820 with the arrival of the first Protestant missionaries.
Also you will find:
**Just past the parking area with a protected area surrounded by a rock wall you will find ancient  petroglyphs(ancient carvings)
**Nearby is Ninole Cove, a small beach with a grassy area and lagoon good for swimming
** Restrooms, picnic tables and camping (by permit)  are also available
Please be advised however:
Although easily accessible there is no lifeguard on duty. Swimming can be dangerous due to strong rip currents and a very rocky bottom.
Always check ocean conditions before entering the ocean-
** When in doubt, don’t go out! Great advise from the locals.
Located on Hwy 11, 27 miles south of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park.
For more information or to book your vacation to Hawaii Island :
Contact:Linda Dancer Email: linda@honeymoonsinc.com  Direct Line 828-256-1520
Toll Free 1-888-811-1888 ext 331

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